Soldiers Goes to Serve Sentence

Identifier

WWP16155

Date

Description

Undated newspaper clipping about George E. Howard.

Source

Cary T. Grayson Papers, Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library, Staunton, Virginia

Format

pdf file

Language

English

Text

WITH 36 WOUNDS SOLDIER GOES TO SERVE SENTENCE
______
Life’s curtain slowly whispered its way into its colossal proscenium Monday morning on another epoch in the life of George E. Howard. Howard fought for Uncle Sam for nearly two years and carries the wound marks of thirty-six Boche bullets on his body. Now Howard is to be punished by Uncle Sam for violating the statutes laid down by the government.

Howard was a member of the 90th Division. He went overseas and—perhaps it was the thought of his crime that led him on, but he was recognized as the most reckless and fearless man in the division. He fought desperately over the crevassed, pock-marked and shell-torn section of France and received thirty-six separate and distinct wounds. Part of his nose is artificial and has been grafted on. He wears a silver plate in his head and his body is practically riddled with machine-gun bullets and shrapnel.

Howard was indicted for violating the Mann white slave act and entered a plea of guilty. According to the indictment he brought a girl relative from Oklahoma to Texas. This happened before he entered the army. He became a member of the 9oth Division and went overseas—as he said—hoping to meet death.

He said he realized the notority of his crime and wanted to make atonement for it—even with his life.

Judicial clemency was impossible in his case, despite his acts of heroism overseas. He was sentenced to serve fourteen months in Leavenworth prison by Judge James C. Wilson.

Original Format

Letter
Article

Files

Citation

“Soldiers Goes to Serve Sentence,” 1919, WWP16155, Cary T. Grayson Papers, Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library & Museum, Staunton, Virginia.