Ellen Axson Wilson to Woodrow Wilson

Identifier

WWP14955

Description

Ellen Axson Wilson writes to her husband, Woodrow Wilson.

Source

Library of Congress

Publisher

Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library & Museum

Language

English

Spatial Coverage

Baltimore, MD

Text

My own darling

I have been getting quite miserable for want of an opportunity to write to you. This is literally the first I have had! We had breakfast at nine yesterday. We I had just finished and talked with Mrs. Reid for a quarter of an hour when they came for me to go to church,— and I did not get back to the house until 10 at night! I would have written then, tired as I was, if I had had a light that I could see by

Then Madge insisted that we must be at the college by 9.30 this morning to secure a seat, so I hurried through breakfast and was off at nine,— returned just in time for a half past one dinner from which we have just arisen.

In spite of my early start yesterday, we reached the church too late to secure a seat out of the gallery, so that the services were to me all dumb show. Afterwards I dined with Madge and her friends in hall, then they all went, fourteen of them, went to her room to meet me. We really had a very pleasant time together,– they are very attractive girls. At 3.30 I started to the hospital, having been lucky enough to find a guide, a sweet young girl in training there, the sister of one of the doctors. She belonged to Madge's “fraternity” at the University of Wis. & was over at the college to see her “sisters” I spent a delightful hour and a half with your Aunt. She is lovely. And it was most -fortunate- I went then, for she leaves for Chillicothe today. The doctor says there is nothing the matter with her heart, – it is all “nerves.” Then having telephoned for a cab, I drove to Mary Hoyts to tea, and she brought me home at 9.45.

The exercises this morning were much more entertaining than the Princeton Class Days, — but that will keep. Margaret came back to dinner with me. I am going to see Mrs. Bird presently and in the meantime am hoping against hope that Ed will turn up. I am to have the carriage at 5.30 and it will be nice if I can find them to drive with me. In the morning at ten I take Margaret to the occulists. So you see in a way all goess well, though in another sense not at all, for Mrs. Reid is ill in bed & I havn't seen her since yesterday morning. She was almost speechless then with a heavy cold. And they are to sail for Europe on Saturday! It gives me the most unhappy sense of making a convenience of our friends to be here under such circumstances; though it is unnecessary to add that they seem to like being made a convenience of. They are lovely! But oh how glad I will be to get back to my darling! I havn't heard from you yet, — am hoping for a few lines by bedtime. I am a bit homesick to tell the truth, – I want my love more than tongue can tell.

But I must close and try to see the Birds. Margaret is very happy and sends love to all. She is here with me now. Dear love & kisses to the children, and for your dear self love beyond expression from

Your own, Eileen

Original Format

Letter

Files

http://resources.presidentwilson.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/WWP14955.pdf

Citation

Wilson, Ellen Axson, “Ellen Axson Wilson to Woodrow Wilson,” 1902 June 2, WWP14955, Ellen Axson Wilson Letters, Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library & Museum, Staunton, Virginia.

Transcribe This Item

  1. http://resources.presidentwilson.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/WWP14955.pdf