Woodrow Wilson to Herbert Hoover

Identifier

WWP19361

Description

Woodrow Wilson replies to Herbert Hoover saying that regardless of a potential shortage at home, wheat supplies must be sent overseas because he is confident that the American people will willingly face this sacrifice.

Source

Hoover-Wilson Correspondence, Hoover Institution, Hoover Institution Archives, Stanford, California

Publisher

Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library & Museum

Format

pdf file

Language

English

Text

THE WHITE HOUSE
washington

My dear Mr. Hoover

I have your letter of yesterday and realize the very great seriousness of the prospect you point out, namely, a probable shortage for our own people of 15,000,000 a month in the wheat supply, and you close your letter by saying, “It seems to me it is a matter which requires your decision.”

I am not sure what it is you think I ought to decide. I suppose you mean that I ought to decide whether we are to continue our present scale of shipment of breadstuffs across the seas and so incur the shortage for our own people to which you refer. I am afraid there is no choice in the matter. The populations across the sea must be fed and have, as I understand it, no available substitutes for wheat, whereas our own people have at least substitutes and have them, I believe (have they not?) in adequate quantities. Personally, I feel confident that the spirit of our people would rise to the sacrifice and that, if there are adequate quantities of the available substitutes, they would be willing to use them. Is not that your own judgment?

Cordially and sincerely yours,
WOODROW WILSON

Original Format

Letter

Files

http://resources.presidentwilson.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/D09367B.pdf

Citation

Wilson, Woodrow, 1856-1924, “Woodrow Wilson to Herbert Hoover,” 1918 March 8, WWP19361, Hoover Institute at Stanford University Collection, Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library & Museum, Staunton, Virginia.